Simple Feasts

Notes 1

simplefeasts

10 April 2014

cdnfoodie:

Made my first artichoke today! Did not realize the leaf tips had thorns and definitely got a few stuck in my fingers when I was picking out the artichoke at the store…lesson learned.

Simply Recipes has a great “how-to” guide on how to prepare, cook and eat artichokes, complete with pictures (http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how_to_cook_and_eat_an_artichoke/) Since I don’t have have a steamer basket big enough to fit the artichoke, I looked around online and decided to boil the artichoke instead: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/amanda-greene/artichokes-bake-boil-steam_b_3158427.html

I place the artichoke in a pot and filled it with water until the artichoke was about 2/3 submerged. Add a bay leaf, lemon juice, ~2 tsp of salt into the water, ~1 tsp chicken bouillon, and ~1 tsp minced garlic (didn’t have whole garlic cloves) Boiled/simmered for about 20 minutes, then prepared a dipping sauce of melted butter + lemon juice + garlic.

Overall, the artichoke was pretty tasty, but I felt like it was more work than it was worth…not sure if I’ll make it again. While artichokes are supposed to be pretty healthy, pretty sure the melted butter sauce negated any health benefits =P

Notes 1

simplefeasts

9 April 2014

cdnfoodie:

"Deep dish" homemade pizza.

Recipe for the pizza dough was doing on All Recipes: http://m.allrecipes.com/recipe/20171/quick-and-easy-pizza-crust

I followed the recipe exactly, although times were estimated (did other chores during the “rest” periods) I greased a casserole pan, not realizing how much dough there was, so wound up with semi-deep dish pizza as I flattened/stretched the dough into the pan. Sprinkled some Italian seasoning onto the flattened dough, added tomato sauce, mushrooms, fresh thyme, pepperoni and mozzarella. Baked at 450F for 15 min. Crust came out crisp on the outside and so fluffy on the inside. Definitely a keeper!

Notes 254

simplefeasts

26 March 2014

One of the keys to pie-dough making is to use only cold ingredients. To make sure all ingredients stay at a cool temperature, always use ice water when making dough. The less the fats are melted into the dough, the flakier the pastry will be. Add just enough water to bring the dough together. Too much water will toughen the dough, and too little will yield a crumbly texture.

(

Good Housekeeping (via foodopia)

If you have a food processor cubing the butter, then freezing it, is not a bad idea.

(via geekgirlsmash)

Food processors for pie crusts. All the way.

Also, replacing half the cold water with cold alcohol (vodka is a good one since there’s no real flavor that comes through - but tequila is great with fruit pies like peach and rum is excellent with custard pies like chocolate cream or coconut cream) will inhibit gluten formation in your pie dough and not only make the dough easier to handle and harder to overwork, but less likely to shrink or otherwise misbehave in the oven.

(via techsgtjenn)

Oh and if you don’t have/can’t afford a food processor, you can use a pastry blender*, and just pop your butter in the freezer for 15 minutes or so, enough to get it extra cold not long enough for it to freeze. 

*or a fork, or knives, but from personal experience, those two just leave you there, arm no longer wanting to move, and near tears, because it’s still not blended.

(via geekgirlsmash)

(via geekgirlsmash)

)

Notes 6

simplefeasts

17 March 2014

geekgirlsmash:

I am going to take a moment to talk about cupcake pans. See the one of the far right, with those lovely handles? It is literally the nicest cupcake pan I have ever met, I found it by chance in a thrift store and it cost $2. The design is brilliant, the big handles mean you don’t dent the tops of your cupcakes/muffins, which is common if you’re me. The handles are heavy duty, and riveted in place, this pan is not fucking around. 
The pan itself is from Wilton, in the mysterious days of yore when cupcake pans were brilliantly designed. The pan next to it is the current model of Wilton cupcake pans, and you can see that something went terribly wrong. 
I just really want Wilton to go back to their old model of pan, because it’s so much better. We’re talking light from the heavens, choir of angels singing, better. I would pay more for them, than their current model if they brought this pan back. It’s just such a good design. 

geekgirlsmash:

I am going to take a moment to talk about cupcake pans. See the one of the far right, with those lovely handles? It is literally the nicest cupcake pan I have ever met, I found it by chance in a thrift store and it cost $2. The design is brilliant, the big handles mean you don’t dent the tops of your cupcakes/muffins, which is common if you’re me. The handles are heavy duty, and riveted in place, this pan is not fucking around. 

The pan itself is from Wilton, in the mysterious days of yore when cupcake pans were brilliantly designed. The pan next to it is the current model of Wilton cupcake pans, and you can see that something went terribly wrong. 

I just really want Wilton to go back to their old model of pan, because it’s so much better. We’re talking light from the heavens, choir of angels singing, better. I would pay more for them, than their current model if they brought this pan back. It’s just such a good design. 

Notes 11

simplefeasts

17 March 2014

http://geekgirlsmash.tumblr.com/post/79864905100/generally-speaking-i-hate-novelty-cake-pans-its

geekgirlsmash:

Generally speaking I hate novelty cake pans, it’s not that I’m actually adverse to silly shaped cakes, it’s more that they’re very limited usage. When I was very young my mom would actually buy novelty pans for our birthday cakes. While she was reasonably rational with her choices, like a teddy…

Notes 14249

simplefeasts

19 February 2014

Notes 2293

simplefeasts

19 January 2014

Notes 3

Steak & Gorgonzola Pasta with Red Wine Sauce

Ingredients: 

1 pound sirloin, thinly sliced

1/2 box of pasta, preferably a shape (not long strands)

2 c. mixed frozen vegetables, thawed

1/4 c. red wine, any

1 TBSP garlic

2 TBSP basil 

2 TBSP oregano

2 TBSP rosemary

4 TBSP olive oil 

1/2 tsp pepper

salt to taste

1 c. Gorgonzola cheese, in small cubes

Directions:

1. Prepare pasta according to directions, reserve 1/4 c. pasta water. Drain and set aside. 

2. Combine oil, wine, all spices in a large sauce pan on low heat, as well as pasta water. Simmer five minutes.

3. Turn heat to medium. Add steak, cook 2 min.

4. Add vegetables, cook 2 min.

5. Add pasta, cook 1 min. stirring constantly.

6. Arrange on plates, and put Gorgonzola on just before serving.

Serves 4.

Notes 1

simplefeasts

31 October 2013

How to Make Easy, Fast, Foolproof Bread from Scratch

cdnfoodie:

This is such a great and easy recipe. I ended up making only 1/3 of it (1 packet of active dry yeast = 0.25oz = 0.5 tbsp, + 1 cup warm water, 0.5tbsp salt, 2 cups flour, and some rosemary) Also the dough ended up sitting at room temperature for closer to 8 hours before I put it in the fridge (accidentally fell asleep much earlier than planned, oops!)

I pulled handfuls of the dough and rolled the dough into longer rolls and baked for about 20 minutes at 450F. It came out delicious! The crust was a bit harder than I would have liked, so next time I’ll bake for a shorter amount of time and/or lower the temperature. The inside was nice and fluffy though. Definitely will be making this again!

Notes 79090

simplefeasts

15 October 2013

(Source: veganinspo, via froth)

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